Posts made in October 2018

Michelle Lee - Director of USPTO

8 Remarkable Things About Michelle Lee

Michelle Lee joined the league of female pioneers as the first female director of the United States Patent and Trademark Office.  But who is Michelle Lee? Here are eight things you may not know about the USPTO’s fearless former leader:

  1. Lee was also the Deputy Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property. Part of her responsibilities while serving with the Department of Commerce was to advise the president on domestic and international intellectual property matters.
  2. Lee greatly influenced the Silicon Valley USPTO. In 2012, Lee served as the first director of the Silicon Valley USPTO. Before that, she served on the USPTO’s Patent Public Advisory Committee, advising the USPTO on patent policies.
  3. Lee was an IP power house in the Silicon Valley. Lee was named the Best Bay Area IP Lawyer and one of the Top 100 most influential women in the Silicon Valley by the San Francisco Business Times and the San Jose Business Journal.
  4. Lee has also served as deputy general counsel for Google. Lee served as the company’s first Head of Patents and Patent Strategy. During her time at Google, Lee built Google’s patent portfolio from only a few patents to over 10,000!
  5. She has plenty of experience being a leader. Before Google, Lee was a partner at Fenwick & West, where she represented leading high-tech firms such as Cisco Systems, Logitech, Apple, and Sun Microsystems.
  6. Lee is well versed in electrical engineering and computer science with degrees from MIT. Prior to becoming a lawyer, Lee worked as a computer scientist at Hewlett-Packard Research Laboratories and the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory.
  7. Lee grew up in the heart of the Silicon Valley. Lee grew up in Saratoga, California, and after going away for college, she returned to the Bay Area to earn her law degree from Stanford University.
  8. She has a surprising skill. Fun fact: Lee trained for 16 years as a classical ballet dancer.

Michelle Lee is now one of the most exciting business speakers that we have seen in years. Learn more at www.nextupspeakers.com/michelle-lee.com.

Vivek Wadhwa made-in-usa

Why Trump’s Trade War Could Be the Tipping Point for American Manufacturing

by Vivek Wadhwa

When Western companies moved manufacturing to China, it was all about minimizing costs. China was a developing country with labor costs among the lowest in the world. It also offered massive subsidies and readily turned a blind eye to labor abuse and environmental degradation. Continue reading

Lance Secretan - Inspiring Workplaces

The Shortage of Inspiring Places to Work

by Lance Secretan

Business leaders are crying the blues about the so called, “shortage of talent”.

Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic, a Professor of Psychology at Columbia University, where he teaches MBA students, says that when he began teaching MBA students they all wanted to work for corporate giants like Goldman Sachs, IBM, and Unilever. A decade later, those names were more likely to be Google, Facebook, Apple and Amazon. But today, he says, MBA students no longer want anything to do with the corporate world at all. Continue reading

Deborah Perry Piscione - Creating Value First

Creating Value before Making Money

by Deborah Perry Piscione

In 2010, Stanford University graduate Kevin Systrom was working on a multifeatured HTML5 (the markup language that structures content for the web) check-in project on mobile photography, originally called Burbn. He began to build the prototype without any branding elements or design at all, just concentrating on its functionality and usability. After meeting a VC from Baseline Ventures and another from Andreesen Horowitz at a party, Systrom pitched his idea and within two weeks, he had raised a total $500,000 from both. Continue reading

Speaker Robert Safian - Artificial Intelligence

5 Lessons of the AI Imperative, from Netflix to Spotify

by Robert Safian for Fast Company

Last month, Netflix quietly deleted all the remaining user reviews on its service. And just like that, CEO Reed Hastings completed the latest shift in his company’s ever evolving strategy: away from the wisdom of crowds in its content recommendations, in favor of the wisdom of the machine. The algorithm is now firmly in charge at Netflix—as it increasingly is across the economy.

The past year has seen a crescendo of fascination with—and fear of—artificial intelligence. This theme is a central feature of the tech backlash buffeting formerly bulletproof companies like Facebook and Google, fueling U.S. congressional hearings and editorial-page outrage. Yet it’s also the most potent new engine for business efficiency, an essential driver of competitive advantage from Amazon to Accenture. Continue reading